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Could a Tug-of-War Between Two Central Texas Counties Leave Residents Without Drinking Water?

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April 16, 2019

It’s important to understand that in Texas, there are two kinds of water.

Originally published by Texas Monthly

There’s surface water, the stuff that flows through rivers and gets dammed up in reservoirs. All of that is allocated down to the acre-foot with mind-boggling precision to cities, special utility districts, and wholesale suppliers. Then there’s the water that’s underground. Products not of engineering but of rainfall that has collected in sand and limestone formations over millennia, aquifers supply approximately 60 percent of the water used in Texas. About 75 percent of that is for agriculture, with the rest split between industrial and domestic uses. Nearly a fifth of the state’s drinking water is pumped from the ground. Yet the consumption of groundwater is regulated with less vigor and uniformity than the pumping of Permian oil.

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April 10, 2019

The Harvey Data Project

The City of Houston Housing and Community Development Department conducted analysis on Hurricane Harvey's impacts on the population, and developed a new method that more accurately assesses damages.

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